Your three stones of knowledge: the LIVErtising exam

August 17, 2017

I want to confirm here the information I gave  in the first lecture. (Added June 3: do not miss the Q&A in the comments at the bottom of the post!) Added August 17: Timetable for the September exam at the bottom of the post

YOUR STUDY

The exam contents correspond to the information shared during the lectures, on the basis of the slides – I mean, the oral contents shared during the lectures, not just the slides. The evaluation itself will be based on three concepts from the course. You’ll draw at random three cards from a triple list inluding:

(1) core concepts (2) supporting concepts (3) illustrating concepts.

  • Three stones of knowledgeCore concepts:

A presence is not a strategy ++ A/B testing ++ Ad blocking ++ Adserving ++ Advertising in a cookieless world ++ Adwords ++ Algorithm ++ Amplification ++ Artificial intelligence ++ Attitudes towards advertising ++ Auction system ++ Banner advertising ++ Black hat ++ Bottom up ++ Brand monitoring ++ Bring the trust back ++ Build / Interact / Amplify ++ CDJ shaping ++ Contents ++ Conversion ++ Cookie tracking ++ Creative vs data-driven digital ++ CTR ++ Customer experience ++ Customer experience mapping ++ Data Intelligence ++ Data vs creative skills ++ Digital as a science or an art ++ Display advertising ++ Do you need digital? ++ Engagement ++ Four pillars of webpage optimisation ++ Google ++ Google updates ++ IAB ++ Inbound marketing ++ Interruptive advertising ++ Is SEO a technical job? ++ Search Keywords ++ Listening ++ Loyalty ++ Marketing communication models ++ Measuring ++ Networked communication ++ Off-page ++ On-page ++ Online targeting ++ Outbound marketing ++ P – E – M2 ++ Permissions marketing ++ programmatic advertising ++ R-A-C-E model ++ REACH-ACT-CONVERT ++ remarketing ++ retargeting ++ S-M-A-R-T ++ S-O-S-T-A-C ++ Search ++ Second screen ++ SEE-THINK-DO ++ SEO ++ SEO is dead ++ Spamdexing ++ Sponsored results ++ Start with WHY? ++ Strategy vs tactic ++ The CDJ evolution ++ The marketing funnel ++ The SEO process ++ Top down communication ++ Tracking ++ Trust ++ UGC ++ User value ++ UX ++ Webvertising ++ White hat

  • Supporting concepts

#1 position on Google ++ a presence is not a strategy ++ accelerated loyalty journey ++ ad exchange ++ ad network ++ ad spending trends ++ ad tags ++ Adrank ++ advocacy ++ adwords extensions ++ AIDA ++ alerts ++ alternative keywords ++ AMP ++ amplify ++ anchor text ++ ATAWAD ++ Avinash Kaushik ++ backlinks ++ behavioural targeting ++ benchmarking ++ bidding ++ bounce rate ++ brand bashing ++ building a presence ++ click fraud ++ cloaking ++ content spinning ++ context ++ Crash the Superbowl ++ crawling ++ cross device behaviour ++ dashboards ++ daytime targeting ++ dialogue marketing cycle ++ digital inventory ++ digital pricing models ++ Doritos ++ DSA ++ duplicate content ++ E-A-T building ++ engagement marketing ++ featured snippets ++ fingerprinting ++ FMOT ++ generation C & P ++ Google Analytics ++ growth hacking ++ hashtag hijacking ++ head vs long tail ++ Hootsuite ++ https ++ Hummingbird ++ hybrid professionals ++ IAB standards ++ indexing ++ interacting ++ keyword density ++ keyword stuffing ++ known ID ++ KPI vs metrics ++ landing page ++ leads ++ link farming ++ local SEO ++ long tail ++ lookalike audience ++ machine learning ++ media consumption trends ++ meta tags ++ mobile micro-moments ++ mobile retargeting ++ mobile use and mobile advertising ++ NAP ++ Occam’s Razor ++ organic vs PPC ++ P-0-E media ++ Page load speed ++ Panda ++ Penguin ++ persona ++ Pigeon ++ post purchase ++ post-tail ++ predictive analysis ++ premium inventory ++ privacy issues ++ quality score ++ query engine ++ Rankbrain ++ Real time ++ remnant inventory ++ reputation management ++ rich answers ++ ROI ++ RTB ++ sentiment analysis ++ SERP ++ shared media ++ situation analysis ++ social intelligence ++ social media marketing ++ social media monitoring ++ social media research ++ social signal ++ SOLOMO ++ stable ID ++ statistical ID ++ strategic vision ++ T-O-W-S analysis ++ the accelerated loyalty journey ++ the ad industry messed up ++ the customer’s intent ++ the evolution of display ++ the funnel ++ touchpoints ++ unstructured data ++ user value ++ web 2.0 ++ web 3.0 ++ ZMOT ++

  • Illustrative concepts

#McDStories ++ #TakeAction ++ A/B Tasty ++ AdID ++ Alexa ++ ALT tag ++ app-to-app retargeting ++ AR ++ ATAWAD ++ ATD ++ Attribution models ++ Bing ++ BrowSEO ++ Buzzsumo ++ cross-device retargeting ++ Cyfe ++ D-E-A-L standards ++ design thinkers academy ++ Digimedia ++ Disconnect ++ DMP ++ DSP ++ Duck Duck Go ++ Echo ++ Ecosia ++ Edelman Trust Barometer ++ FMOT ++ Gatorade Mission Control ++ Ghostery ++ Google Analytics ++ Google Consumer Barometer ++ Google content experiments ++ Google My activity ++ Google My Business ++ Google Partners ++ Google trends ++ Hashtag For Life ++ Hubspot ++ IAB standards ++ IDFA ++ incognito mode ++ ITTT ++ Keyword planner ++ L-E-A-N ads ++ L’Oréal Makeup genius ++ Mention ++ meta tags ++ metadescription ++ mobile retargeting ++ native advertising ++ nearables ++ negative SEO ++ Nielsen Global Trust in Advertising ++ Occam’s Razor ++ Optimizely ++ Page speed insights ++ Panopticlick ++ Patagonia ++ post tail ++ Privacy Badger ++ private browser window ++ Search console ++ SEO Quake ++ Smart Insights ++ social login ++ Social searcher ++ social signal ++ Socialmention ++ Spy Fu ++ SSL ++ SSP ++ Starbuck personalized cups ++ Statcounter ++ Sysomos ++ Tagboard ++ Talkwalker ++ the accelerated loyalty journey ++ the CDJ lens ++ trust elements ++ Tweetbinder ++ Tweetdeck ++ Twubs ++ user value ++ utm tracking ++ Varvy ++ vertical vs horizontal search engines ++ Visual Website Optimizer ++ VR ++ wearables ++ web bloat ++ web-to-appad retargeting ++ web-to-web retargeting ++ WebPageTest ++ Website grader ++ Webview technology ++

I’ll update and complete this list after the last lecture. This is now the complete list for the 2017 exam.

YOUR EXAM

Your aim will be to show you have clearly understood these concepts and how they relate to the evolution of marketing communication as we have analysed it in the course. In a nutshell, this evolution has taken us from

(1) interruptive/ top-down/ one-way/ outbound advertising over (2) permission/ bottom-up/ two-way/ inbound advertising to (3) networked/ collaborative/ social/ participatory/ connected communication .

Each concept should be a door that opens up the context it belongs to.

You’ll use five sources of information to provide your answers:

  1. the contents shared during each lecture and formalised in the corresponding keynotes; your notes must complete these slides
  2. the videos embedded in the slides
  3. the quizzes that introduced some of the lectures
  4. the different platforms, sites or services I invited you to test all along the course
  5. your own research based on the course

Additionally, your optional Inbound marketing course with the Hubspot Academy will prove very useful to extend your knowledge, and for those with a taste for even more, there is the information shared on Twitter with the #LIVErtising hashtag.

In a nutshell, your task will be to:

  1. define those concepts

  2. put them in their adequate context and develop that context 

  3. show how they connect with associated concepts

  4. detail how they help us understand the evolution and specific digital dimension of marketing that the course focuses on

Make sure no language problem blurs your message – here the language support should help, or your own language work if you feel your knowledge is shaky.

This exam format is far more open than getting three question. So, it’s easier and also more difficult. It gives you more possibilities: no danger of feeling stuck in a question you do not understand or remember – no set or expected answer, as long as it is relevant, information-rich, coherent and shows that you have understood the context. But is also gives you more responsibility: the need to build your own answer with all the bits and pieces of the course in order to provide a relevant answer that makes sense. In this respect the structure of your answer will be important.

YOUR NOTES

You can still get hold of the student’s notes on our Onedrive below:

 

 

I understand you may want to ask me questions about some of the above concepts. I invite you to submit all your questions as a comment at the bottom of this post. This will enable me to answer publicly and help you all. In earlier posts about the exam you’ll find my answers to such questions.

THE SCHEDULE

Here is the schedule :

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49 Comments. Leave new

Hello Mr Ranschaert,

I have a tiny questions. I have a little misunderstanding about the concept “click fraud”.

Thank you in advance for your answer!

Wendy S

Reply

Hello Wendy, sorry I can’t answer myself now – I just took a second to check its Wikipedia definition, which should prove useful to you: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Click_fraud – Google is your friend! Don’t get me wrong, but I need to correct students’ work for their dissertations. TFE is in the air too!
JP R

Reply

Hello,

It’s okay. I’ve already check on Internet but I’ve some difficulties to really understand who use that kind of technique. I’m gonna look further to have a better understanding of that concept. Thanks for your help.

WS

Reply
Astrid J.
June 4, 2017 10:38

Hello Mr. Ranschaert,

I have a little misunderstanding about ‘what possibilities does remarking offer? (Web to web, app to app, web to app and cross device retargeting) I don’t get the nuance between those concepts and their link with ID known, stable and statistical.

Thanks in advance for your time

Astrid

Reply
Astrid J.
June 4, 2017 11:04

Remarketing*

Reply

I answered that just now Astrid. Please check out Pauline and Cynthia’s questions related to this and let me know how much clearer that is now!

Reply
Astrid J.
June 4, 2017 13:44

It is really helpful !
Thank you very much for your time and your answer,
Astrid.

Reply
Pauline Ponteville
June 3, 2017 10:54

Hello Mr Ranschaert,
Could you help me with these two questions ?

1. I probably misunderstand but why do we say that cookies can be used on mobile applications thanks to Webview technology and then, in web to app remarketing, we say that cookies can’t be used on apps ?
2. To what context can be related Statcounter ?

Best regards,
Pauline Ponteville

Reply

1. This is indeed pretty technical, and should not get too much emphasis. I’ll try to make it clearer in simple terms, bearing in mind my answer to Cynthia’s question about the three categories of IDs. I’m also trying in all my answers just to clarify things, without adding more information to the course itself.

There are two elements to understand the limits of cookie tracking on mobile devices.

A first one is that the cookie is inherently a technology using your browser. Now, the native browser on mobiles using iOS, Safari, blocks cookies by default. When you consider the iOS market share in terms of mobile surf, you realise this is a real limit for advertisers tracking users’ intent.

A second element, which limits the previous statement is that mobile devices use the webview technology to display online content, both web pages in a browser and mobile apps. The webview stores cookies (unless they are blocked, see above). But in a limited way, because each mobile browser and each mobile app store the cookies in their own separate « sandbox », preventing any sharing of cookie information from one to another. This means it is not completely correct to say « cookies don’t work on mobiles », but that the tracking ecosystem on mobile devices is very intricate (see the slide I used to illustrate this).

In short, there is no native way to work cross-device right now, only a set of technical possibilities (cfr the three types of Ids : known, stable and statistical/probabilistic) tapping into the huge networks of services like Google or Facebook. The aim is to match two different Ids as corresponding to the same person, and progressively add more Ids of the same person on other channels/devices.

Let me illustrate this : suppose I log in to my Facebook profile using Chrome on my tablet. FB sets a cookies in my browser, both first-party cookies and third-party/tracking cookies. As I am accessing the mobile Facebook website, Facebook invites me to install the FB mobile app for ease of use, so I accept and start using it. Next time on my tablet I use the app, which recognizes my IDFA or AdID, making it possible for Facebook to associate the browser cookie it set in my Chrome browser with the stable IDFA or AdID ID it read when I opened the FB app. This enables the FB network to retarget me cross-app, from mobile browser to mobile app, and possibly cross-device.

2. Statcounter: visit the site gs.statcounter.com/ to realise it provides updated information you may need as a webdesigner, marketer, … – I used it to show the respective market shared of Google vs Bing vs DuckDuckGo in Belgium. It may help you realise, for instance, that the browser used on tablets is Belgium is Safari with 72% market share. If you need to retarget web-to-web on tablets in Belgium, this may prove to be a problem (cfr. above).

Reply
Laurence Picalausa
June 4, 2017 20:32

Hello Mr Ranschaert,

I still have a question about AdID and IDFA. Is this identifier the same on a mobile and a tablet for a user? Otherwise how is cross-device retargeting possible?

Thanks in advance for your answer,

Laurence Picalausa

Reply

Not until that mobile and tablet are somehow identified as belonging to the same person through a progressive identification process – see the last part of my answer to Pauline about this issue.

Good morning Mr. Ranschaert,

Sorry for bothering you again with some questions…
First of all, I was wondering what you’re expecting from us to talk about for these concepts:

– contents (should we speak about content marketing/conversation marketing, the marketing models
and engagement : interact + amplify?)
– context (aida funnel, content meets context, touchpoints?)

Secondly, I’ve got some difficulties understanding if cookies are used in mobile apps or not (considering the Webview technology, but the fact that we can’t retarget from app to app).

Looking forward to reading you,

Have a nice day and again, thank you so much for your time.

Laetitia

Reply

Indeed Laetitia, your suggestions are correct. I do not expect a closed, specific answer. The concepts you get are doors you can open.
I have just answered the mobile cookie question also asked by Pauline – please see there.
OK?
JP R

Reply

Yes, thank you !

See you on Tuesday,

Laetitia

Reply
Cynthia Neuprez
June 3, 2017 10:18

Hello Mr. Ranschaert,

I have a little misunderstanding about the 3 different ID (stable, know and statistical) I understand the statistical one but I don’t get the nuance between stable and know and how does they get it

Thanks in advance for your time

Cynthia N.

Reply

Tough one, Cynthia. Good you’re asking.
These are three broad categories bringing together a range of techniques intended to solve the problems connected to the (disappearing) third-party (or tracking) cookie.

Known identifiers are based on some form of personal identification, such as a name, address, pseudo, user name, etc. This is typically the case with social logins, using your Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter Ids to login to another site. This site then has access to (part of) the personal data you have passed on to that social network. This is highly accurate data, up-to-date, including demographic and interest profiles and provide very good cross-browser and cross-device identification.

Stable identifiers are associated with a specific device or browser, using a unique identifier used by the operating system of the mobile app. Examples are Apple’s IDFA (“identifierForAdvertising”) used on iOS devices or Google’s AdID used on the Chrome browser and Android devices. These are persistent, cannot be erased (contrary to cookies) but provide an opt-out to deal with privacy concerns. These stable identifiers are not really universal, but given the reach of Google’s ecosystem for example, using a Google or affiliate place on one device and later on another device will enable Google to match those two devices as belonging to the same user.

Finally, statistical IDs are based on fingerprinting identification where a series of configuration elements of your device are enough to build a fingerprint that identifies you with more than 85 % accuracy : IP address, device type, and browsing patterns. Using such characteristics, some specialised companies such as Drawbridge or TapAd even manage to identify the same user cross-device, providing a single ID on both devices, that can then be used for targeting purposes. But, as the name suggests, this method is only probabilistic, with its accuracy increasing every day. The dark side of the force, in reality (personal opinion).
I tried my best. Does it help?
JP R

Reply
Cynthia Neuprez
June 4, 2017 08:38

A lot ! Many thanks
It’s really more understandable now

Reply
manon nélis
June 2, 2017 18:28

Hello M. Ranschaert,

I’m so sorry, but I still have a small question…

I have a little misunderstanding about the DSA.

Thank you very much for your time and your answer,

Have a good evening !

Manon. N

Reply

You’ll find the DSA concept in the chapter about SEA. It is the acronym for a Dynamic Search Ad. This is an implementation of artificial intelligence, where the Google algorithm determines which search query to respond to, writing an appropriate headline based on that query, and matching this to the most appropriate URL on your website, usually a commerce website at this stage. The ad is dynamic in the sense that the headline and URL are not defined by the advertiser but by the algorithm. Panicky!
The slides in this chapter will help you visualise this.
JP R

Reply
manon nélis
June 3, 2017 18:04

It is really helpful !
Thank you very much for your time and your answer,

See you on the 8th of June !

Manon Nélis

Reply
Camille H.
June 2, 2017 17:35

Hello sir,

I’m a bit lost with the “generation C & P” concept… OK gen C is focussed on content, wants conversations, is creative, etc. But is that all? What about Gen P? I’m not sure to understand what you expect from us for this part… Could you help me?

Many thanks!

Reply

In order to list and remember many changes that the present consumer presents, you can easily refer to this audience as generation C and generation P, as many changes bear a “C” (e.g. control, community, connected, …) or a “P” (they use platforms rather than instal software, they post (to produce their own contents), they personalise products, …) – it’s nothing more than a mnemonic to summarize many of those changes. Why remember them? Because this is your audience, as a marketer.
JP R

Reply
manon nélis
June 2, 2017 16:51

Hello Mr Ranschaert, how are you?

Excuse me but I still do not understand the model of attribution (I’ve read your answer to Pauline’s question but I still have difficulties with this model)

Could you please give me a short explanation about this concept?

Reply

Manon, I have just updated my answer to Pauline about this, to make it even clearer. This is as far as I can go in a written answer. Hope it helps now. Find it easily with CTRL+F for “attribution” on this page!
JPR

Reply
Pauline F.
June 2, 2017 16:24

Hello M. Ranschaert,

I told you I still had questions… (sorry!)

– Programmatic Advertising : What is, in simple words, the difference between ad network and ad exchange? I’ve seen your video and others but I still don’t get it… 🙁

– Digital fingerprinting : I understand the concept theoretically but I don’t know how it would work and how can they know that my browser is specific to me (unique, like a fingerprint), for example with Panopticlick?

– Mobile retargeting : it’s said on my notes that this is classic retargeting but for mobile apps but we’ve seen that cookies don’t work with apps, and basically retargeting works with cookies so I don’t understand how mobile retargeting works…

-Data intelligence et social intelligence : I know this is a question you already respond to, but I thought it was linked to machine learning (is it though?) and how do you link it to social intelligence?

Thank you very much for your time and patience to respond,

Best Regards,

Pauline F

Reply

I’ll answer your question tomorrow morning, Pauline. Promise! Two Desperados red on me if I fail to do so 😉

Reply
Pauline F.
June 2, 2017 18:18

Hahahaha 😀 No problem sir,

Have a nice night!

Reply

Hello again Pauline, no need to apologize 😉
1. In simplified terms, an ad network is an intermediary (a broker) between the advertiser (or more usually the advertising agency) and the publisher, that is intended to organise the sales of the publisher’s inventory and the demand from the advertiser/agency. It acts as a media sales and buying agency but as it brings together (1) inventory from a wide range of publishers with virtually unlimited web advertising space and (2) demand from many advertisers/agencies, it is called a network. Basically, ad networks make the selling and buying processes automatic, or programmatic, removing the need of a personal contact between seller and buyer.
Another dimension is added when the selling/buying process is not only automated but also ruled by an aution, like the stock exchange. This is where ad exchanges comes in : the seller (i.e. the publisher) offers their advertising slots on the exchange, where the buyer (i.e. the advertiser / agency) do not buy that space, but put a bid for a type of audience. Algorithms are then used to find the best match between offer and bid. The specific plus offered by networks is not the use of algorithms ( enabling automation), but the bidding system.
A third development comes into play when that bidding process happens in real time. This is Real Time Bidding. That auction/bidding does not necessarily happen in this way.
So : ad networks provide automated selling and buying ; ad exchanges provide automated bidding, which may be in real time (RTB) or not.

2. you don’t neet to go beyond the theoretical understanding of the concept; the technical implementation of the concept is beyong our scope. Which does not mean you can’t research this for your own interest. Anyway, the companies implementing or using this are not likely to communicate a lot of information publicly on this!

3. This is a very wide and burgeoning field which we just touched upon briefly in the course. Machine learning is just one aspect of Artificial Intelligence. In marcom it is increasinbly used to mine data provided by users (pictures, text, networks and time series), where it can gain insights that go far beyond human analysis (for example recognizing patterns from unstructured data, separating noise from real information, and at a speed that enable these algorithms to process huge amounts of data virtually in real time) while at the same time becoming better at things where humans excel and even beat computers (e.g. face or image recognition) but are limited by time / space / quantity.
These developments not only enable data scientists to “listen” more efficiently to user signals, i.e. traditional monitoring, but also to be much better at research by applying predicive data intelligence.
This connects with several other elements in the course, such as the need to blend creative guts feelings with data, the use of AI by search engines, i.e. the Google Hummingbird update and Rankbrain to understand queries better, to integrate understanding of natural language, to enable real conversations between a user and their vocal assistant (vocal search, chatbots, home assistants, …)

OK?
JP R

Reply
Pauline F.
June 3, 2017 13:33

Thank you very much M. Ranschaert !
It’s so much clearer with your explanations… Could you give me your brain for my exam please?

Have a nice day ! 🙂

Pauline

Reply
Pauline F.
June 5, 2017 08:49

Hello Sir, how are you today?

I’ve recheck the answer while studying at my course and I saw that the question 3 wasn’t really answered… About mobile retargeting 🙂 I’m hoping that it works quite the same as app-to-app retargeting and the sandbox that opens but could we say that app-to-app retargeting is difficult because there no link between all the sandbox (and also why advertisers need to use others technologies such as digital fingerprinting or the 3 types of ID? Those technologies also work on apps right?) I’m a bit confused…

Thank you very much for your time and rich answer! 😉

Have a great day!

Pauline

Reply

Let me insist again, this is not mainstream (yet), and (1) is still pretty confusing for even professionals in the field (2) should not take too much of your time away from stable techniques such as standard display or SEO. As there is a technical limit to all those technologies, except known identifiers, it is only by combining all of them and plugging them into the huge Google and social networks that you can progressively connect two IDs that seem different in the first place, to one single user. To answer Laurence a little further, and you at the same time: your original ID on your iPhone and your iPad are different, but by forcing you to log into your apple account, which is identical for both devices, the Apple network is able to identify those two IDs as belonging to the same person. If you go on with my previous example about FB, you see how your individual ID across browsers, apps and devices can progressively by built. Now, I suggest this is really enough focus on this element of the course, Pauline!

Colienne Cornet
June 2, 2017 11:08

Hello Mr. Ranschaert,

I don’t really understand 3 concepts, could you please give me an explanation of them?
– AdRank
– Quality Score
– Attribution models

Thank you very much !

Colienne

Reply

Hello Colienne,
thank you for asking.
I have just answered the “attribution models” question a little earlier – please read that and let me know if it is clearer.
Adrank and QS are related concepts of SEA. I suggest you google or youtube the two concepts to get more context, but basically Adrank is the algorithm that Google uses to auction its adwords in a way where the max CPC, your bid on that keyword (string), is mitigated by the Quality Score of the website and landing page. This shows that you do not buy an adword ad for a particular keyword, you bid for it. The amount you bid is compounded by the user value and experience (as in SEO) provided by your site and landing page. This QS includes elements such as the CTR Google predicts your ad is going to get, the relevance of your content, the device-friendliness of your page, its historical performance, … . As for any search engine algorithm, there are only guesses at their exact ingredients and importance. What is certain is that Adrank enables bidders with a small budget but good QS to win the auction before bigger budgets with poorer QS.
Hope this is clear?
JP R

Reply
Colienne Cornet
June 2, 2017 14:55

Yes, it was really helpful !
Thank you and have a good day,
Colienne

Reply

Hello !

If you read the last list of concept starting from the bottom, you might notice the “web-to-ad retargeting”. I assume it is a little typing mistake. “Web-to-app retargeting”, right ? 🙂

Reply

Good pair of eyes with a well organized brain on top! Indeed, thank you Jean-Marc.
JP R

Reply
Laetitia Rolin
June 1, 2017 12:54

Hello Mr. Ranschaert :-),

I have difficulties understanding the 3 following concepts . Would you mind giving me an explanation about them?

– Strategic vision
– Head vs Long Tail
– Data intelligence (And can we consider social intelligence as a subfield of it?)

Thank you very much.

Have a nice daaaaaay,

Laetitia

Reply

OK, Laetitia, good you’re asking. Here are just a few elements that will get you on your way. Let me know if that is sufficient:
1. strategic thinking or vision is “starting with why”: defining objectives of your action, based on a vision/mission/values, i.e. planning your action, knowing where you are going to and why. You’ll need to implement this strategic into concrete actions, i.e. tactics. Now, after executing those tactics you’ll want to measure them (you remember P-E-M2 ?). You measure tactics in terms of metrics, while your objectives (i.e. your strategy) will require KPI to measure.
2. Head keywords are short queries in a search engine, e.g. “sunglasses”; long-tail keywords are longer queries, for example “trendy sunglasses winter sports Woluwe”. They have different characteristics in terms of search volume, competition, ranking and conversion, e.g. optimizing on long-tail keywords (one of the imperatives of local SEO) is easier because competition is lower, as volume is smaller and ranking easier as a consequence (this is logical thinking). So, head keywords are more suited to visibility objectives (See) while Do is better achieved through long-tail keywords.
3. indeed, see my answers to similar questions
Does that help?
JP R

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Anonymous
June 2, 2017 13:52

Yes thank you.

Reply
Pauline F.
June 1, 2017 10:28

Hello M. Ranschaert,

I have myself some questions about your course :

1. Can you explain with simple words the attribution model?
2. The difference between Social Media Monitoring & Brand Monitoring?
3. And the last one 😉 On-page and Off-page, those are core concepts but I don’t really know how to develop them.

Thank you very much for your time and your answer,

See you on the 6th of June !

Pauline Forton

Reply

Hello Pauline,
sorry I was not able to react under 24 hours, due to the juries I had yesterday and this morning.
1. (updated version to answer Manon) you can understand “attribution” in simple terms as the assignment (or attribution) of an action to a cause, e.g. assigning the fact that you have decided to buy and try out a new drink (=the action, or effect) to a recommendation from a friend (= the cause) . This can happen to different degrees : your friend’s recommendation actually reminded you of the commercial you heard the day before on the radio: both the radio commercial and the recommendation have caused the purchase but the recommendation a little more – so, you could attribute 30% of the purchase to the commercial and 70% to the recommendation.
So: attribution = attributing the causes to specific factors to various extents. This is key to answering the question “how should I optimally spend my advertising money: TV, radio, Adwords, retargeting, …?” on the basis of the attribution you have been able to operate. Ideally, all the touchpoints along the customer journey should be weighed in this way for each purchase or desired action. Now, data collected from the digital customer journey, together with emerging possibilities such as Google’s new Adword metric to measure in-store conversion, will enable marketers to fine tune their attribution and their media expenditure.
Typically, such attributions belong to a set of established attribution models. The most obvious and simplest one is the last-interaction model, where the causal effect is only attributed to the last touchpoint, e.g. an Adwords ad followed by site visit with online purchase – this means that you attribute the online purchase to a 100% to the adword ad, while you know that other advertising efforts must have played a role, without knowing which and how (much). Increasingly the attribution models are getting more sophisticated thanks to the collection of more date and better tracking of digital behaviour. Google can even connect in-store conversion to your journey along the (Google) loop. This connects with the notion of data analysis, analytics, post-cookie tracking, …
2. try to understand this literally: the main difference is between monitoring (past-oriented toward understanding what has happened and what is happening) and research (future oriented towards planning or predicting what is going to happen). Besides you can use “social media”, “brand”, … meaning “monitoring the social media or brand mentions” vs “researching them”.
3. on-page and off-page are the basic two approaches you can use to implement SEO (by the way, I often have students saying “CEO” instead of “SEO”, don’t know why, just a fact…). You need to take care of both. They are a family of operations and actions that will earn you a better ranking to increase your change of converting through search. ON-page operations are carried out on the pages of your site to make sure your pages bring your visitors real user value through great user experience while making sure your pages are easy for the search engine to crawl, index and rank (in this order: user first, search engines second) This involves technical aspects as well as content, i.e. the site architecture, the html as well as the content – refer to the slide detailing possible actions such as providing the images with ALT tags or providing adequate internal linking of your contents. OFF-page is everything you can do outside your pages and site to earn expertise, authority, trust as they are materialised by trustworthy webpages and social media linking back to your site with appropriate anchors, sharing your content, commenting, and so on. This of course supposed great ON-page quality as a starting point.
OK, Pauline does this help?
JP R

Reply
Pauline F.
June 2, 2017 14:15

Hello M. Ranschaert,

Thank you very much for your answer! 😀 This is a lot clearer in my mind but more info to digest 😀 Keep on motivation !
All the best for you juries!

I’ll maybe have other questions until the exam… 😉

Thank you again,

Have a nice day !

Pauline F.

Reply
Lou-Marine Vanden Abeelen
May 31, 2017 10:59

Hello Mr. Ranschaert!

I have a little misunderstanding about 3 concepts.

Could you please give me a short explanation of those concepts? Which other concepts are related to them?
1) Design thinkers academy
2) Creative vs data-driven digital
3) Design thinkers academy

Thank you in advance for your answer!

Kind regards,

Lou-Marine Vanden Abeleen

Reply

Hello Lou,
you’re making my task easier by announcing three questions and actually asking two only.

    Design Thinkers Academy offer training in digital skills such as customer journey mapping. They are active with training sessions in many countries and they are worth remembering because they make canvases and mockups available free online, as well as background information on how to design useful customer journeys integrating personas. Good to use when you’re at this stage of your campaign. Here is the link : http://www.designthinkersacademy.com/freedownload_customerjourneycanvas/

    Creative vs data-driven is the traditional divide between creative people and data crunchers in a team (think account/strategic planners vs creative team in a traditional account group in an agency). Today, definitely in digital, creativity and data need to go hand in hand to deliver results – this is a hybrid or a blended approach. Two examples we studied is making creative decisions through A/B testing and using analytics to monitor people’s behaviour on your digital property, e.g. through bounce rate analysis. Decisions can and need to be evidence (i.e. data) based, not left to guts feelings or creative instinct. This also shows in the job descriptions you find for digital work positions. In short, digital is a hybrid animal!

OK?

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Lou-Marine Vanden Abeelen
May 31, 2017 17:37

Thank you very much for your answer!

Oops… Sorry!
I forgot Data vs. Creative skills

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Answer is included in my preceding one – it boils down to creative vs data-driven communication. Right?

Melissa L.
May 31, 2017 09:44

Hello Mr Ranschaert, how are you?

I still have difficulties with some concepts of your course. Could you please give me a short explanation about them ?

– I understand the concept of CDJ, but what is exactly CDJ mapping and shaping?
– You explained that the funnel is not dead, but isn’t it replaced by the CDJ ?
– What is the difference between Social Intelligence and Data Intelligence. Data Intelligence as a core concept, how do you want us to develop it? In which direction do we have to go?

Thank you very much in advance for your answer
Have a great day !

Melissa Luchs

Reply

Quietly going round the bend, actually, Melissa. These days are hectic for all of us!
1. “Mapping” and shaping are two evolutions of the CDJ concept. Mapping is the organized attempt to draw a plan (= map) of the touchpoints your audience is really exposed to in order to analyse and evaluate the interaction across the different channels. This addresses real journeys from real audience. “Shaping” takes this one step further by tailoring the actual CDJ to your wishes, e.g. by shortening the consideration stage and bringing the customer faster to the purchasing stage. This is what l’Oréal did with their Makeup Genius app. It is also one of the purposes of ibeacons, wearables and home assistants.
2. the funnel and the CDJ are two different perspectives on the same reality. We can no longer consider that the funnel represents correctly the way the consumer interacts with the brand through a range of touchpoints: this is more a loop, with more stages including the post-purchase and loyalty phase. While from the marketer’s perspective, the strategic building blocks may still be theoretized in terms of R-A-C-E (for reach, act, convert and engage: SmartInsights) or See-Thing-Do-Care (A. Kaushik) or Attract-Convert-Close-Delight (Hubspot). So: CDJ = the customer’s angle; funnel = the markete’s angle
3. I have already touched upon this in some other answers – the need to base marketing communication on the integration of data intelligence and creative work to come to better work. This corresponds to the evolution from top-down to bottom-up to networked communication, where conversation and engagement become center-stage. Engagement is interaction + amplification. Interaction requires listeling, while amplification provides food to listen to. Just a few elements to start the ball rolling, right?
OK?
JP R

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Melissa L.
June 2, 2017 14:03

Great ! Thank you very much for your helpful answers 🙂

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